What does Tumblr mean to you?

I’ve been on Tumblr for about 6 months now and I’m surprised to say that the novelty has yet to wear off.

I mainly use the site to keep updated on and entertained by my television and movie fandoms ( [n] The community that surrounds a tv show/movie/book etc. ), and generally let out my inner nerd. From my own personal use, I would have supposed that the site would remain more of an alternative social site, always in the shadows of the more thriving Facebook and Twitter. And yet, despite my suppositions, a Nielsen Co. report finds that Tumblr has gained 183% in popularity from 2010 to 2011.

Further findings from the study include:

  • The site averages 21,280 messages and links posted daily. To better understand this figure, understand that it surpasses the number of blogs hosted by WordPress in one month.
  • More than 57% of Tumblr users are under 34 with only 17.5% over 50 years of age.
  • Tumblr uses are more often female (53%)…but not by much.

So why has this site gained so much popularity? And does its notably younger user base point toward Tumblr’s continued trend and growth?

Technically speaking, Tumblr is a form of microblogging. Microblogging  “differs from a traditional blog[ging] in that its content is typically smaller in both actual and aggregate file size. Microblogs ‘allow users to exchange small elements of content such as short sentences, individual images, or video links.'” Other examples of microblogging include Twitter and even Facebook.

To me, it is easy to see how Tumblr is more similar to Twitter than to a blog, such as WordPress. For one, people don’t often use Tumblr for longer messages or posts. On Twitter, individuals are actually forcibly limited in their content (140 characters max).

As for myself, on Tumblr I often just reblog posts that I find informative, humourous, or interesting; I rarely add unique content to the site. Many times, as with Twitter updates, the content of a post may send  the user to a completely separate site. The main focus is not the post itself, but the links or pictures that may lead to another domain.

Tumblr emphasizes how easy it is to use the site. And certainly, the directions are as simple as the  functions of the site. While some may use Tumblr as a primary blog, I still find the site to be less professional due perhaps in part to its simplicity. By this I mean that I don’t feel that one can accurately learn about me via my Tumblr page, whereas I consider my WordPress blog to be an accurate professional representation of myself (much as some people would consider Facebook to be a personal representation of themselves). There are just fewer opportunities to personalize and declare oneself on Tumblr. But then again, as I mentioned earlier, my primary purpose in having a Tumblr account is to free my inner geek.

I also want to clarify that by “less professional” I do not mean that companies and brands are wasting their time on the site. In fact, I feel that Tumblr is a really great way to reach a niche market– whether it be youth in general, or more specific fandoms of certain products and programs. Tumblr is a community in which people are constantly sharing information, even if there isn’t nearly as much direct conversing. It is also a community filled with very opinionated and interested individuals who are purposely seeking information on things that may interest them.

In my opinion, Tumblr is a fun site, but not one that I would ever put on a resume. It’s a place for me to relax and learn more about things that I might enjoy outside of a professional environment. I would love to hear more about other people’s opinions on the site.

Sound off below or respond to the poll. (Note: the last time I tried a poll it failed miserably. Please prove me wrong and restore my faith in both bloggers and polls).

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Infographic: Social Media & American Users

Social Media keeps us connected. It keeps us informed and up-to-date on the latest news– be it local, national, or personal. And now, by properly studying the use of social media, Hasai social media firm has learned a bit more about American Society as a whole.

Hasai is a social media strategy firm located in California. They specialize in networking, promotions, and content creation/curating via social networking platforms. Recently they conducted an informative study that identifies some of the more common habits of American users on such platforms.

Below is featured an infographic, but I’ve also listed a couple of my favorite facts:

  • 48% of bloggers are U.S. based.
  • 65% of social media referencing the royal wedding (April, 2011) came from the U.S.  The U.K. accounted for only 20%.
  • 77% of Americans use social media to share their love for a favorite television show.
  • New Jersey and North Dakota are some of the most socially active states in the country.

via Mashable

On Amazon, E-Books have the Edge

July 1995:

Amazon.com opens its virtual doors and begins selling hardcover and paperback books.

November 2007:

With the introduction of Amazon’s revolutionary e-book reader, The Kindle, the website also began selling corresponding e-books.

July 2010:

Kindle e-books sales surpass hardcover book sales on the website.

And now, customers are purchasing more Kindle e-books than both hardcover and paperback books combined.

A mere four years after its introduction, the Kindle has become such a popular format that its book sales have surpassed a traditional medium whose popularity lasted thousands of years.

With over 950,000 books to choose from, 790,00 of which are $9.99 or less, users have embraced this new technology. In addition, there are millions of free, out-of-copyright books available for download. The Kindle’s success continues to show rapid expansion, with more than 175,000 books added to the Kindle Store within just the last 5 months.

In response to the Kindle’s swift success, Jeff Bezos, the Founder and CEO of Amazon.com said:

“Customers are now choosing Kindle books more often than print books. We had high hopes that this would happen eventually, but we never imagined it would happen this quickly – we’ve been selling print books for 15 years and Kindle books for less than four years.”

Marketing under the mantra “Buy Once, Read Everywhere,” millions have turned to Kindle’s and other e-book readers as their primary source of Literature. Realizing the success within the market, and understanding the need to compete with these tech-savvy inventions, bookstores such as Barnes & Noble have introduced their own e-book readers. In November 2009, Barnes and Noble introduced the Nook in an attempt to counter Amazon’s Kindle success.

Other tablet devices, such as Apple’s iPad and multiple smart-phone devices, have also hit the market providing similar services.

There is no denying the convenience of e-readers: they allow you to take a multitude of books with you without all the hassle of carrying/lugging, the books are less expensive, they’re light weight, text can be magnified, and numerous other positive attributes. And yet, there remains a niche loyal to the traditional paper and ink method of reading (myself included). After all, no matter how technologically advanced these machines become, it’s impossible to completely replicate the experience of reading a good old-fashion book.

Here are a few more Kindle milestones:

  • Since April 1, 2011, for every 100 print books sold by Amazon, 105 Kindle e-books have been sold (not including the free Kindle books, either).
  • So far in 2011, Amazon has sold more than 3x as many Kindle books as they did during the same period of the previous year.
  • Less than a year after the introduction of the UK Kindle, Amazon.co.uk is selling more Kindle books than hardcover at a rat of more than 2 to 1.

And here are some Amazon.com Fun Facts:

  • The first book sold on Amazon.com was Fluid Concepts & Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought.
  • Amazon.com opened their DVD/Video store in November 1998.
  • In 1999, Time Magazine names Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos “Person of the Year.”
  • In October 2001, Amazon introduces the “Look inside the book” feature on their website.
  • Amazon.com is also responsible for the operation of imdb.com.

Mac (People) vs. PC (People)

Finally, the age-old question has been answered!

No, not the meaning of life or anything as trivial as that, but:

What REALLY is the difference between Mac and PC people?

Hunch has compiled data from over 700,000 unique website visitors in order to create the extensive infographic featured below. From favorite sandwiches to preferred cocktails, artistic preferences to fashion favorites,  and of course the basic demographic information– Hunch seems to have covered it all.

Without making any drastic assumption, Mac users (which I, myself, am) come off a bit pretentious but at least the more intelligent of the two categories. PC users tend to drift toward an older demographic with preferences within the mainstream.

Of course, it’s important to note that a good 23% of people refused to be specified by computer preferences and referred to themselves as loyal to neither brand. Also, of those who did self-identify themselves, only 25% dubbed themselves “Mac People,” while more than double (52%) declared themselves to be “PC People.”

So take a look at your fellow Mac and PC users and see how you fit the bill.

The Trouble with Cover Letters…

…is that they’re hard to write.

As I go through the tedious process of applying for job after job, never hearing back from any of them, and then worrying that something is wrong with my email inbox, I’ve found that one of the most difficult parts is the cover letter.

How do I make myself appealing to a company?

How do I simultaneously express my uniqueness without sacrificing professionalism?

How do I properly convey my enthusiasm?

And, above all else, how do I hide my desperation?

Okay, the last one I’ve managed pretty well, but nevertheless the whole process is daunting.

With each new job possibility comes a new cover letter, or at least a new draft of the original. Right now, looking at my Documents folder, you would find at least 11 files with the words “cover letter” somewhere in the title. Many are just variations of each other, others are failed attempts at me being witty, none are, as of yet, successful.

When you google search “cover letter,” an abundance of websites pop up to assist in helping you write the perfect cover letter. The so-called experts and all of their knowledge is a bit overwhelming, causing me to take each suggestion with a grain of salt. I have, however, discovered that there are a few constants in masses:

1. Absolutly, Positivly, Unconditoinaly NO mispellings or grammatic erors.

(see what I did there?)

2. Take this opportunity to go into greater depth and detail involving your specific skills in relation to the job you are applying for.

3. Individualize it.

4. Highlight how you would be an asset to the company.

5. Each Cover Letter should be Company specific.

(this one might require researching the company, which is always a good idea if you’re applying to work there!)

Am I missing anything? Or is there, quite simply, no perfect recipe. No guarantees. No promises.

Each resume I send seems like a shot in the dark, I guess I’m just hoping one of them will get noticed.

The Oscars Online

In a previous post featuring a rather unsuccessful poll, I asked readers about their Oscar viewing habits in terms of social media. What networks would you stay connected to throughout the show?

Embodying the very spirit of the social media and award show connection was James Franco, who tweeted away from backstage. Despite a less than stellar performance, he at least did well in documenting behind the scenes footage that was enjoyed by thousands of Twitter users. Other celebrities, such as Mark Ruffalo, Jennifer Hudson, and Franco’s fellow co-host Anne Hathaway took to Twitter as well, but more important were the viewers who hit up social network sites and what they were talking about.

Mashable has put together a nice little report of the who, what, and how much from Oscar night. While I’ve featured a couple key/interesting stats in this post, I highly suggestion heading over to the article itself to find out more.

 

Twitter

  • Certain moments throughout the broadcast featured dramatic increases in tweets. For instance, when Oprah Winfrey presented the award for Best Documentary (to Inside Job) a record number of 11,780 tweets were sent out! Here are some more spikes:

  • In terms of Trending Topics, Tweetbeat’s measurements reported that Inception as the most tweeted about film, followed by The King’s Speech second. Other trending films included Toy Story 3, The Social Network, and The Fighter.
  • The twitterverse was similarly interested in the nominees, with James Franco leading the topic trends. Since Franco’s nomination in January, a reported 58, 197 tweets have mentioned the actor. During the award show itself, Franco received 21,117 mentions. His co-host Anne Hathaway was the second-most tweeted about celebrity, followed by Natalie Portman.

 

Facebook

  • During the 24 hour period following the awards show, nearly one million people in the U.S. alone mentioned the word “Oscar” in a status update on Facebook.
  • Of all the Oscar topics, The Kings Speech received the most attention with 152,324 mentions throughout the United States.

To find out more about the world of the web on Oscar night, check out the full article on Mashable.com.

So, how did you stay connected? Did you help make up some of the numbers of these statistics? I know I did.