Old Navy: New Ads, Same Camp

I think the time has come that I dedicate a post to acknowledging a very serious issue that plagues are country today…

Of course I am talking about the Old Navy advertisement campaigns.

While the “Supermodelquins” have been dismantled to make room for a new campaign, the perky Kim Kardashian-esque singer is equally frustrating, leading to a serious introspective Q&A with myself– why on earth can’t I stop shopping there?

First of all, let’s be honest. If there’s a store whose clothes and products we enjoy, a silly commercial isn’t going to keep us from going there. Sure, we may grunt and groan as we hear the store’s speakers blare their latest mantras, but we will grin and bear it. With that in mind, I sometimes wonder if Old Navy is really just trying to test us…or is it just me?

Let’s begin with the newly departed Supermodelquins. Plastic display mannequins dressed in Old Navy fashions. And they can talk. Oh, and how they talk! Often their ‘witty banter’ gets frightfully close to making sexual connotations that personally make me feel uncomfortable (hint, they play up the ‘plastic’ thing a lot). The commercials were colorful yet campy. And yet, it was this exact cornball attitude that they hoped to put forth. Assisted by Crispin, Porter & Bogusky, Old Navy hoped to return to their so-called “campy” marketing roots.

The latest campaign, while not outright campy, certainly makes a mark of its own. The commercials tout the theme: “Old Navy Records. Original hits. Original styles.” The stars of these latest spots are a group of sings and dancers. While the acts are said to change as time goes on, the current group is a trio called Audio Threadz. The ads have been getting a lot of publicity due to the lead female singer’s eerie resemblance to Kim Kardashian (coincidence?). Supposedly influenced by the success of Glee (but what isn’t nowadays), the company says research has shown that their own consumers are music fans as well. While time will tell how successful, or possibly just annoying, these commercials turn out to be, one thing is for certain– they stick with you. For better or for worse.

Old Navy identifies their target customer as women ages 25 to 30, typically moms. And, while I can’t speak for myself seeing as I’m part of neither category, apparently supermodelquins and pop numbers are the way to go. Afterall, so what if we like the commercials, it’s the fact that we remember them, that we write about them, that we spend time thinking about them– and thus thinking about Old Navy itself.

 

 

Fashion Police turn Grammar Police

I hate to admit it, but I am that obnoxious person who corrects your grammar.

You are doing well not good (unless you’re out volunteering). End of story.

While I am far from perfect (go ahead, search through all my posts, you’re sure to find several mistakes), I try my best to use proper grammar and I understand it’s importance especially in presenting yourself. The way you speak and write are valuable reflections of yourself. I think people can generally agree that this is true, right?

Okay, that being said, who on earth would by this shirt from Wet Seal:

Is this a fashion statement or the result of outsourcing clothing design to non-English speaking countries?

While I could take this moment to comment on fashion’s fondness for t-shirts with distasteful and tacky messages, I would rather concentrate on this whole new level of offensiveness. Wet Seal’s primary customers are young (and impressionable?)ย  girls and women. In a day in age where teachers complain that kids use “texting lingo” in school essays, do we really need another reminder of our society’s grammatical failures?

So was this spelling error intentional or a careless mistake? The company has been a bit unclear about the truth behind the t-shirt. In response to the publicity, Wet Seal’s official Twitter page tweeted:
“It’s a fashion statement … I am jealous for you’re [sic] keen eye for grammatical errors though.”

We can assume this second mix up of the proper “your/you’re”s was a joke and I applaud them for their wit, however I simply cannot get over the t-shirt. I don’t know, am I over-reacting or is this disregard for proper grammar especially annoying? Weigh in and let me hear what you think!

In the meantime, I think I’ll carry a sharpie around with me so I can add an ‘e’ and apostrophe to anyone I see wearing this shirt.

Essentials for Literature Lovers

I’m a bit of a bookworm, and I don’t care who knows it. For that reason, I was so excited to find out about this website. Out of Print Clothing (.com) sells some unique and gorgeous t-shirts featuring vintage book covers. From Pride & Prejudice, to Catch 22, there’s a perfect shirt for every reader. And best of all, each purchase is guilt-free, knowing that Out of Print works to help spread literacy and a love of reading. As their mission states:

In addition to spreading the joy of reading through our tees, we acknowledge that many parts of the world don’t have access to books at all. We are working to change that. For each shirt we sell, one book is donated to a community in need through our partner Books For Africa.

Personally, I’m excited to get this one:

[ http://www.outofprintclothing.com ]